AdaCore Blog

22 entries tagged with #SPARK Pro

by Emma Adby

It's time to Make with Ada!

The challenge Are you ready to develop a project to the highest levels of safety, security and reliability? If so, Make with Ada is the challenge for you! We’re calling on embedded developers across the globe to build cool embedded applications using the Ada and SPARK programming languages and are offering over $8000 in total prizes. In addition, eligible students will compete for a reward of an Analog Discovery 2 Pro Bundle worth $299.99!

by Fabien Chouteau

Ada on FPGAs with PicoRV32

When I bought the TinyFPGA-BX board, I thought it would be an opportunity to play a little bit with FPGA, learn some Verilog or VHDL. But when I discovered that it was possible to have a RISC-V CPU on it, I knew I had to run Ada code on it.

#embedded    #RISC-V    #Ada   

by Fabien Chouteau

Ada on the micro:bit

Updated July 2018

#embedded    #Ada    #nRF51    #ARM   

by Yannick Moy, Martin Becker, Emanuel Regnath

Physical Units Pass the Generic Test

The support for physical units in programming languages is a long-standing issue, which very few languages have even attempted to solve. This issue has been mostly solved for Ada in 2012 by our colleagues Ed Schonberg and Vincent Pucci who introduced special aspects for specifying physical dimensions on types. This dimension system did not attempt to deal with generics though. As was noted by others, handling generics in a dimensional analysis that is, like in GNAT, a compile-time analysis with no impact on the executable size or running time, is the source of the problem of dimension handling. Together with our partners from Technical Universitat München, we have finally solved this remaining difficulty.

#GNAT     #typing   

by Yannick Moy

Research Corner - Floating-Point Computations in SPARK

It is notoriously hard to prove properties of floating-point computations, including the simpler bounding properties that state safe bounds on the values taken by entities in the program. Thanks to the recent changes in SPARK 17, users can now benefit from much better provability for these programs, by combining the capabilities of different provers. For the harder cases, this requires using ghost code to state intermediate assertions proved by one of the provers, to be used by others. This work is described in an article which was accepted at VSTTE 2017 conference.

#Formal Verification    #SPARK   

by Fabien Chouteau, Arnaud Charlet, Yannick Moy

SPARK Tetris on the Arduboy

One of us got hooked on the promise of a credit-card-size programmable pocket game under the name of Arduboy and participated in its kickstarter in 2015. The kickstarter was successful (but late) and delivered  the expected working board in mid 2016. Of course, the idea from the start was to program it in Ada , but this is an 8-bits AVR microcontroller (the ATmega32u4 by Atmel) not supported anymore by GNAT Pro. One solution would have been to rebuild our own GNAT compiler for 8-bit AVR from the GNAT FSF repository and use the AVR-Ada project. Another solution, which we explore in this blog post, is to use the SPARK-to-C compiler that we developed at AdaCore to turn our Ada code into C and then use the Arduino toolchain to compile for the Arduboy board.

by Raphaël Amiard, Yannick Moy, Pierre-Marie de Rodat

Going After the Low Hanging Bug

At AdaCore, we have a strong expertise in deep static analysis tools (CodePeer and SPARK), and we have been relying on the compiler GNAT and our coding standard checker GNATcheck to deal with more syntactic or weakly-semantic checks. The recent Libadalang technology, developed at AdaCore, provided us with an ideal basis to develop specialized light-weight static analyzers. As an experiment, we implemented two simple checkers using the Python binding of Libadalang. The results on our own codebase were eye-opening: we found a dozen bugs in the codebases of the tools we develop at AdaCore (including the compiler and static analyzers).

#Static Analysis   

by Yannick Moy

New Year's Resolution for 2017: Use SPARK, Say Goodbye to Bugs

​NIST has recently published a report called "Dramatically Reducing Software Vulnerabilities"​ in which they single out five approaches which have the potential for creating software with 100 times fewer vulnerabilities than we do today. One of these approaches is formal methods. Among formal methods, the report highlights strong suits of SPARK, and cites SPARK projects as example of mature uses of formal methods. NIST is not the only ones to support the use of SPARK. Editor Bill Wong from Electronic Design has included SPARK in his "2016 Gifts for the Techie". So if your new year's resolutions include software without bugs, have a look at SPARK in 2017.

#VerificationTools    #Formal Methods    #SPARK   

by Johannes Kanig

SPARK and CodePeer, a Good Match!

It turns out that the CodePeer engine can be used as a powerful prover for SPARK programs. This feature will be available in the next version of SPARK Pro, make sure you try it out!

#Formal Verification    #SPARK   

by Claire Dross

SPARK 2014 Rationale: Support for Type Invariants

Type invariants are used to model properties that should always hold for users of a data type but can be broken inside the data type implementation. Type invariant are part of Ada 2012 but were not supported in SPARK until SPARK Pro 17.

#SPARK   

by Yannick Moy

Research Corner - Proving Security of Binary Programs with SPARK

Researchers from Dependable Computing and Zephyr Software LLC have presented at the latest NASA Formal Methods conference last week their work on proving security of binary programs. In this work, they use SPARK as intermediate language and GNATprove as proof tool, which is an atypical and interesting use of the SPARK technology.

#Formal Verification    #SPARK    #Security   

by AdaCore Admin

Provably safe programming at Embedded World

AdaCore continues to build reliable and secure software for embedded software development tools. Last month, we attended Embedded World 2016, one of the largest conferences of its kind in Europe, to present our embedded solutions and our expertise for safety, and mission critical applications in a variety of domains.

#ARM    #emb2016    #embedded    #Embedded World   

by AdaCore Admin

Formal Verification Made Easy!

We are pleased to announce our latest release of SPARK Pro! A product that has been jointly developed alongside our partner Altran and following the global AdaCore Tech Days, you can now see the SPARK 2014 talk, Formal Verification Made Easy by AdaCore’s Hristian Kirtchev, on YouTube.

#SPARK Pro    #SPARK2014     #SPARKPro16   

by Yannick Moy

SPARK 2014 Rationale: Support for Ravenscar

As presented in a recent post by Pavlos, the upcoming release of SPARK Pro will support concurrency features of Ada, with the restrictions defined in the Ravenscar profile of Ada. This profile restricts concurrency so that concurrent programs are deterministic and schedulable. SPARK analysis makes it possible to prove that shared data is protected against data races, that deadlocks cannot occur and that no other run-time errors related to concurrency can be encountered when running the program. In this post, I revisit the example given by Pavlos to show SPARK features and GNATprove analysis in action.

#Language    #Formal Verification    #SPARK   

by David Hauzar

SPARK 16: Generating Counterexamples for Failed Proofs

While the analysis of failed proofs is one of the most challenging aspects of formal verification, it would be much easier if a tool would automatically find values of variables showing why a proof fails. SPARK Pro 16, to be released in 2016, is going to introduce such a feature. If a proof fails, it attempts to generate a counterexample exhibiting the problem. This post introduces this new feature, developed in the scope of the ProofInUse laboratory.

#Formal Verification    #SPARK   

by AdaCore Admin

AdaCore Tech Days 2015

#AdaCoreTechDay    #GNAT Pro    #CodePeer    #SPARK Pro    #SPARK    #QGen   

by Jack Mellor

2015: A Space Ada‑ssey

AdaCore has a long history of providing tools and support to develop mission critical applications for Space. Check out this video we made and showed at the conference to see which ones!

#Space    #UK   

by Jamie Ayre

20 years on...

20 Years of AdaCore: Company as Committed as Ever on Safety-Critical Software Solutions

#20th Anniversary    #AdaLove   

by Olivier Ramonat

AdaCore Releases GNAT Pro 7.3, QGen 1.0 and GNATdashboard 1.0

February saw the annual customer release of a number of important products. This is no mean task when you consider the fact that GNAT Pro is available on over 50 platforms and supports over 150 runtime profiles (ranging from Full Ada Support to the very restricted Zero Footprint Profile suitable for safety-critical development). All in all, from the branching of the preview version to the customer release it takes us nearly 4 months to package everything up! Quality is assured through the internally developed AdaCore Factory.

#GNAT Pro    #SPARK Pro    #GPS    #GNATbench    #GNATdashboard    #Ada    #AdaCore Factory    #CodePeer    #QGen   

by Tristan Gingold, Yannick Moy

Tetris in SPARK on ARM Cortex M4

Tetris is a well-known game from the 80's, which has been ported in many versions to all game platforms since then. There are even versions of Tetris written in Ada. But there was no version of Tetris written in SPARK, so we've repaired that injustice. Also, there was no version of Tetris for the Atmel SAM4S ARM processor, another injustice we've repaired.

#SPARK    #ARM   

by Johannes Kanig

SPARK 15: Errors, Warnings and Checks

The messages issued by the SPARK toolset will change a bit in the next version of both SPARK Pro and SPARK GPL. This post explains the change and the motivation behind it.

#Formal Verification    #SPARK   

by Claire Dross

Contracts of Functions in SPARK 2014

In SPARK 2014, we can write a function F and annotate it with a pre and a postcondition. In this post, we explain how the SPARK 2014 proof tool handles a call to such a function.

#Formal Verification    #SPARK