AdaCore Blog

27 entries tagged with #Open Source

by Rob Tice

SPARKZumo Part 2: Integrating the Arduino Build Environment Into GPS

This is part #2 of the SPARKZumo series of blog posts. This post covers the build system that was used to build the SPARKZumo project and how to automate the process in GPS.

#GPS    #Python    #Libadalang    #Arduino    #CCG   

by Yannick Moy

Two Days Dedicated to Sound Static Analysis for Security

​AdaCore has been working with CEA, Inria and NIST to organize a two-days event dedicated to sound static analysis techniques and tools, and how they are used to increase the security of software-based systems. The program gathers top-notch experts in the field, from industry, government agencies and research institutes, around the three themes of analysis of legacy code, use in new developments and accountable software quality. Here is why it is worth attending.

#SPARK    #Frama-C    #Security    #Formal Methods    #Static Analysis   

by Yannick Moy

Tokeneer Fully Verified with SPARK 2014

Tokeneer is a software for controlling physical access to a secure enclave by means of a fingerprint sensor. This software was created by Altran (Praxis at the time) in 2003 using the previous generation of SPARK language and tools, as part of a project commissioned by the NSA to investigate the rigorous development of critical software using formal methods. The project artefacts, including the source code, were released as open source in 2008. Tokeneer was widely recognized as a milestone in industrial formal verification. We recently transitioned this software to SPARK 2014, and it allowed us to go beyond what was possible with the previous SPARK technology. We have also shown how security vulnerabilities introduced in the code can be detected by formal verification.

#SPARK    #Formal Methods   

by Pierre-Marie de Rodat, Yannick Moy, Fabien Chouteau, Raphaël Amiard

AdaCore at FOSDEM 2018

Every year, free and open source enthusiasts gather at Brussels (Belgium) for two days of FLOSS-related conferences. FOSDEM organizers setup several “developer rooms”, which are venues that host talks on specific topics. This year, the event will happen on the 3rd and 4th of February (Saturday and Sunday) and there is a room dedicated to the Ada programming language.

by Lionel Matias

Leveraging Ada Run-Time Checks with Fuzz Testing in AFL

Fuzzing is a very popular bug finding method. The concept, very simple, is to continuously inject random (garbage) data as input of a software component, and wait for it to crash. If, like me, you find writing robustness test tedious and not very efficient in finding bugs, you might want to try fuzzing your Ada code. Here's a recipe to fuzz-test your Ada code, using American Fuzzy Lop and all the runtime checks your favorite Ada compiler can provide. Let's see (quickly) how AFL works, then jump right into fuzzing 3 open-source Ada libraries: ZipAda, AdaYaml, and GNATCOLL.JSON.

#Testing    #Ada    #VerificationTools   

by J. German Rivera

Make with Ada 2017- A "Swiss Army Knife" Watch

Summary  The Hexiwear is an IoT wearable development board that has two NXP Kinetis microcontrollers. One is a K64F (Cortex-M4 core) for running the main embedded application software. The other one is a KW40 (Cortex M0+ core) for running a wireless connectivity stack (e.g., Bluetooth BLE or Thread). The Hexiwear board also has a rich set of peripherals, including OLED display, accelerometer, magnetometer, gryroscope, pressure sensor, temperature sensor and heart-rate sensor. This blog article describes the development of a "Swiss Army Knife" watch on the Hexiwear platform. It is a bare-metal embedded application developed 100% in Ada 2012, from the lowest level device drivers all the way up to the application-specific code, for the Hexiwear's K64F microcontroller. I developed Ada drivers for Hexiwear-specific peripherals from scratch, as they were not supported by AdaCore's Ada drivers library. Also, since I wanted to use the GNAT GPL 2017 Ada compiler but the GNAT GPL distribution did not include a port of the Ada Runtime for the Hexiwear board, I also had to port the GNAT GPL 2017 Ada runtime to the Hexiwear. All this application-independent code can be leveraged by anyone interested in developing Ada applications for the Hexiwear wearable device.

by Jonas Attertun

Make with Ada 2017: Brushless DC Motor Controller

This project involves the design of a software platform that provides a good basis when developing motor controllers for brushless DC motors (BLDC/PMSM). It consist of a basic but clean and readable implementation of a sensored field oriented control algorithm. Included is a logging feature that will simplify development and allows users to visualize what is happening. The project shows that Ada successfully can be used for a bare-metal project that requires fast execution.

#Makers    #MakewithAda    #STM32    #embedded   

by Yannick Moy

Prove in the Cloud

We have put together a byte (8 bits) of examples of SPARK code on a server in the cloud. The benefit with this webpage is that anyone can now experiment live with SPARK without installing first the toolset. Something particularly interesting for academics is that all the code for this widget is open source. So you can setup your own proof server for hands-on sessions, with your own exercises, in a matter of minutes.

#SPARK   

by Fabien Chouteau

Ada on the first RISC-V microcontroller

The RISC-V open instruction set is getting more and more news coverage these days. In particular since the release of the first RISC-V microcontroller from SiFive and the announcement of an Arduino board at the Maker Faire Bay Area 2017.

#Embedded Development    #Ada    #RISC-V   

by Yannick Moy

Frama-C & SPARK Day Slides and Highlights

The Frama-C & SPARK Day this week was a very successful event gathering the people interested in formal program verification for C programs (with Frama-C) and for Ada programs (with SPARK). Here is a summary of what was interesting for SPARK users. We also point to the slides of the presentations.

#SPARK   

by Yannick Moy

Two Projects to Compute Stats on Analysis Results

Two projects by Daniel King and Martin Becker facilitate the analysis of GNATprove results by exporting the results (either from the log or from the generated JSON files) to either Excel or JSON/text.

#Dev Projects    #Open Source    #SPARK   

by AdaCore Admin

AdaCore attends FOSDEM

Earlier this month AdaCore attended FOSDEM in Brussels, an event focused on the use of free and open source software. Two members of our technical team presented.

#SPARK    #Events   

by Johannes Kanig

Hash it and Cache it

A new feature of SPARK2014 allows to use a memcached server to share proof results between runs of the SPARK tools and even between developers on different machines. Check out this post to see the details.

#Formal Verification    #SPARK   

by Emmanuel Briot

Integrate new tools in GPS

This blog, the first in a series, explains the basic mechanisms that GPS (the GNAT Programming Studio) provides to integrate external tools. A small plugin might make your daily workflow more convenient by providing toolbar buttons and menus to spawn your tool and parse its output.

#GPS   

by Yannick Moy

Verified, Trustworthy Code with SPARK and Frama-C

Last week, a few of us at AdaCore have attended a one-day workshop organized at Thales Research and Technologies, around the topic of "Verified, trustworthy code - formal verification of software". Attendees from many different branches of Thales (avionics, railway, security, networks) were given an overview of the state-of-practice in formal verification of software, focused on two technologies: the SPARK technology that we develop at AdaCore for programs in Ada, and the Frama-C technology developed at CEA research labs for programs in C. The most interesting part of the day was the feedback given by three operational teams who have experimented during a few months with either SPARK (two teams) or Frama-C (one team). The lessons learned by first-time adopters of such technologies are quite valuable.

#SPARK    #Formal Methods   

by Emmanuel Briot

Debugger improvements in GPS 17

The GNAT Programming Studio support for the debugger has been enhanced. This post describes the various changes you can expect in this year's new release of GPS.

#GPS   

by Quentin Ochem

Unity & Ada

Using Ada technologies to develop video games doesn’t sound like an an obvious choice - although it seems like there could be an argument to be made. The reverse, however, opens some more straightforward perspectives.

#GitHub    #Ada    #GNAT    

by Emmanuel Briot

Bookmarks in the GNAT Programming Studio (GPS)

As we improve existing views in GPS, we discover new ways to use them. This post shows some of the improvements done recently in the Bookmarks view, and how you can now use it as a TODO list.

#GPS   

by Fabien Chouteau

Make with Ada: Formal proof on my wrist

When the Pebble Time kickstarter went through the roof, I looked at the specification and noticed the watch was running on an STM32F4, an ARM cortex-M4 CPU which is supported by GNAT. So I backed the campaign, first to be part of the cool kids and also to try some Ada hacking on the device.

#SPARK2014     #Smartwatch    #Makers   

by Emma Adby

Modernizing Adacore's Open-Source Involvement

Through the adoption of GitHub we have taken our first step on the way to having a more collaborative and dynamic interaction with, both our users and open source technologies.

#GitHub    #OSS    #Ada   

by AdaCore Admin

HIS Conference 2015, Bristol

We are excited to be sponsoring and exhibiting at the 2nd annual High Integrity Software conference, taking place on 5th November 2015 at The Royal Marriott Hotel in Bristol.

#OSS    #IoT    #Programming     #HIS   

by Anthony Leonardo Gracio

How to prevent drone crashes using SPARK

The Crazyflie is a very small quadcopter sold as an open source development platform: both electronic schematics and source code are directly available on their GitHub and its architecture is very flexible. Even if the Crazyflie flies out of the box, it has not been developed with safety in mind: in case of crash, its size, its weight and its plastic propellers won’t hurt anyone! But what if the propellers were made of carbon fiber, and shaped like razor blades to increase the drone’s performance? In theses circumstances, a bug in the flight control system could lead to dramatic events. In this post, I present the work I did to rewrite the stabilization system of the Crazyflie in SPARK 2014, and to prove that it is free of runtime errors. SPARK also helped me to discover little bugs in the original firmware, one of which directly related with overflows. Besides the Crazyflie, this work could be an inspiration for others to do the same work on larger and more safety-critical drones.

#UAVs    #crazyflie    #SPARK    #Drones   

by Tristan Gingold, Yannick Moy

Tetris in SPARK on ARM Cortex M4

Tetris is a well-known game from the 80's, which has been ported in many versions to all game platforms since then. There are even versions of Tetris written in Ada. But there was no version of Tetris written in SPARK, so we've repaired that injustice. Also, there was no version of Tetris for the Atmel SAM4S ARM processor, another injustice we've repaired.

#SPARK    #ARM   

by Cyrille Comar

Welcome To AdaCore's Blog

I'm proud, if not a bit nervous, to be the one firing the very first post on this brand new blog. Why are we starting a corporate blog at this time? There are many reasons for this. The main one is that there are many things happening at AdaCore and around the GNAT technology and we are seeking better ways to make them widely known while offering interested recipients the possibility to react and interact with us.

by Yannick Moy

Studies of Contracts in Practice

Two recent research papers focus on how program contracts are used in practice in open source projects, in three languages that support contracts (Eiffel obviously, Java with JML contracts and C# with Code Contracts). I'm reporting what I found interesting (and less so) in these two studies.

#Language    #Formal Verification    #Contracts   

by Yannick Moy

Muen Separation Kernel Written in SPARK

The University of Applied Sciences Rapperswil in Switzerland has released last week an open-source separation kernel written in SPARK, which has been proved free from run-time errors. This project is part of the secure multilevel workstation project by Secunet, a German security company, which is using SPARK and Isabelle to create the next generation of secure workstations providing different levels of security to government employees and military personnel. I present why I think this project is worth following closely.

#Language    #Formal Verification    #SPARK   

by Yannick Moy

MISRA-C 2012 vs SPARK 2014, the Subset Matching Game

The MISRA C subset of C defines around 150 rules that restrict C programs for critical software development. Of these, 27 rules are classified as undecidable, which means that few MISRA C checkers (if any) will help checking those hardest rules. Here is how SPARK 2014 can help checking similar rules in Ada programs.

#Formal Verification    #SPARK    #MISRA-C