AdaCore Blog

18 entries tagged with #GitHub

by Pat Rogers

Getting started with the Ada Drivers Library device drivers

The Ada Drivers Library (ADL) is a collection of Ada device drivers and examples for ARM-based embedded targets. The library is maintained by AdaCore, with development originally (and predominantly) by AdaCore personnel but also by the Ada community at large.  It is available on GitHub and is licensed for both proprietary and non-proprietary use.

#Ada    #Devices    #drivers    #STM32    #embedded   

by Raphaël Amiard, Yannick Moy, Pierre-Marie de Rodat

Going After the Low Hanging Bug

At AdaCore, we have a strong expertise in deep static analysis tools (CodePeer and SPARK), and we have been relying on the compiler GNAT and our coding standard checker GNATcheck to deal with more syntactic or weakly-semantic checks. The recent Libadalang technology, developed at AdaCore, provided us with an ideal basis to develop specialized light-weight static analyzers. As an experiment, we implemented two simple checkers using the Python binding of Libadalang. The results on our own codebase were eye-opening: we found a dozen bugs in the codebases of the tools we develop at AdaCore (including the compiler and static analyzers).

#Static Analysis   

by Raphaël Amiard, Pierre-Marie de Rodat

Introducing Libadalang

AdaCore is working on a host of tools that works on Ada code. The compiler, GNAT, is the most famous and prominent one, but it is far from being the only one. At AdaCore, we already have several other tools to process Ada code: the ASIS library, GNAT2XML, the GPS IDE. A realization of the past years, however, has been that we were lacking a unified solution to process code that is potentially evolving, potentially incorrect Ada code. Hence Libadalang.

#Ada    #tooling   

by Fabien Chouteau

Make with Ada: DIY instant camera

There are moments in life where you find yourself with an AdaFruit thermal printer in one hand, and an OpenMV camera in the other.

#Makers    #Ada    #STM32    #ARM    #Embedded Development   

by AdaCore Admin

Make With Ada Winners Announced!

Judging for the first annual Make with Ada competition has come to an end and we can now reveal the results.

by Quentin Ochem

Unity & Ada

Using Ada technologies to develop video games doesn’t sound like an an obvious choice - although it seems like there could be an argument to be made. The reverse, however, opens some more straightforward perspectives.

#GitHub    #Ada    #GNAT    

by Emmanuel Briot

GNAT Programming Studio (GPS) on GitHub

The GPS source repository has been published on GitHub. This post briefly describes how you can access it, and hopefully contribute.

#GPS    #GitHub   

by AdaCore Admin

Introducing the Make With Ada competition!

If you’ve been looking for a way to start your next embedded project in Ada or SPARK. Then, look no further than the Make with Ada competition!

#MakewithAda    #embedded    #SPARK     #Ada   

by Fabien Chouteau

Make with Ada: ARM Cortex-M CNC controller

I started this project more than a year ago. It was supposed to be the first Make with Ada project but it became the most challenging from both, the hardware and software side.

#Makers    #Ada    #STM32    #ARM    #Embedded Development   

by Fabien Chouteau

Make with Ada: Candy dispenser, with a twist...

A few months ago, my colleague Rebecca installed a candy dispenser in our kitchen here at AdaCore. I don’t remember how exactly, but I was challenged to make it more… fun.

by Jérôme Lambourg

Porting the Ada Runtime to a new ARM board

A step by step tutorial to adapt the ARM runtime to new MCUs/boards.

#Bareboard    #ARM    #GNAT     #STM32    #Ravenscar   

by Fabien Chouteau

Make with Ada: Formal proof on my wrist

When the Pebble Time kickstarter went through the roof, I looked at the specification and noticed the watch was running on an STM32F4, an ARM cortex-M4 CPU which is supported by GNAT. So I backed the campaign, first to be part of the cool kids and also to try some Ada hacking on the device.

#SPARK2014     #Smartwatch    #Makers   

by Emma Adby

Modernizing Adacore's Open-Source Involvement

Through the adoption of GitHub we have taken our first step on the way to having a more collaborative and dynamic interaction with, both our users and open source technologies.

#GitHub    #OSS    #Ada   

by Yannick Moy

New Book About SPARK 2014

If you're somewhat interested in formal methods applied to software, but you never had the chance to really look at it, now is the time! Prof. John McCormick from University of Northern Iowa and Prof. Peter Chapin from Vermont Technical College have written a truly essential book for getting up to speed with formal verification using SPARK. I really love this book, and here are the aspects I love most:

#SPARK    #Formal Methods    #Teaching   

by Raphaël Amiard

Make with Ada : From bits to music

I started out as an electronic musician, so one of my original motivations when I learnt programming was so that I could eventually *program* the sounds I wanted rather than just use already existing software to do it.

#Makers    #Ada    #Embedded Development   

by Fabien Chouteau

Make with Ada: "The Eagle has landed"

July 20, 1969, 8:18 p.m. UTC, while a bunch of guys were about to turn blue on Earth, commander Neil A. Armstrong confirms the landing of his Lunar Module (LM), code name Eagle, on the moon. Will you be able to manually land Eagle on the Sea of Tranquillity?

#Makers    #NASA    #GtkAda    #Ada 2012   

by Fabien Chouteau

Make with Ada: All that is useless is essential

A few weeks ago I discovered the wonderful world of solenoid engines. The idea is simple: take a piston engine and replace explosion with electromagnetic field. In this article I will experiment a solenoid engine using a hacked hard drive and a software controller on a STM32F4 .

#Makers    #Ada    #Embedded Development    #Devices   

by Anthony Leonardo Gracio

How to prevent drone crashes using SPARK

The Crazyflie is a very small quadcopter sold as an open source development platform: both electronic schematics and source code are directly available on their GitHub and its architecture is very flexible. Even if the Crazyflie flies out of the box, it has not been developed with safety in mind: in case of crash, its size, its weight and its plastic propellers won’t hurt anyone! But what if the propellers were made of carbon fiber, and shaped like razor blades to increase the drone’s performance? In theses circumstances, a bug in the flight control system could lead to dramatic events. In this post, I present the work I did to rewrite the stabilization system of the Crazyflie in SPARK 2014, and to prove that it is free of runtime errors. SPARK also helped me to discover little bugs in the original firmware, one of which directly related with overflows. Besides the Crazyflie, this work could be an inspiration for others to do the same work on larger and more safety-critical drones.

#UAVs    #crazyflie    #SPARK    #Drones